You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Apple’ tag.

VRMobileBIVI_HotVendorMobility continues to be a hot adoption area in business intelligence, according to our research across analytics and line of business departments. Nearly three-quarters (71%) of organizations said their mobile workforce would be able to access BI capabilities in the next 12 months according to our next generation mobile business intelligence research. Roambi, a provider of mobile business intelligence applications, has made important strides this year after moving to deploying its products in the cloud, an event that I covered previously. Roambi is rated as one of the top providers of mobile business intelligence or what we refer to as a ‘Hot Vendor’ according to our Value Index.

Earlier this year, Roambi announced a partnership with Box, which offers cloud-based data storage and file sharing. More recently it began to catch up with the market by announcing support for the Android mobile operating system. Roambi has focused on the mobile BI market from its inception, first by building on the Apple iPhone’s small screen and then progressing to support the majority of mobile devices in corporations today.

The Box partnership, announced in March, enables joint Box and Roambi customers to visualize and interact with data stored on the Box file sharing system. Specifically, users are able to sync Roambi Analytics, the company’s visualization engine, and Roambi Flow, its storyboarding capability, with Box. The integration allows fast importation of Box source files and the ability to create and share interactive reports through Roambi Analytics and to create digital magazines and content through Roambi Flow. Data can be automatically refreshed in real time via Box Sync.

This partnership serves both companies since the coupled service provide users with expanded capabilities and little overlap. Box’s rapid growth is being driven by its ease of use, open platform and cloud approach to file sharing. Thisis a natural platform for Roambi to build on and expand its customer base. For Box, Roambi’s dynamic visualization and a collaboration capabilities address its business customers’ needs and increase its market opportunities. In our benchmark research on information optimization 83 percent of organizations said it is important to have components that provide interactive capabilities to support presentation of information.

Roambi also works with other application vendors in the CRM and ERP market to integrate their applications. The same research shows that CRM (for 45%) and ERP (38%) are important types to integrate with others especially in areas such as sales and customer service. Apple’s recent announcement of a new SDK, should facilitate process integration between software systems so that, for example, users can access and navigate applications such as those from Box and Roambi and transactional applications such as CRM and ERP in a single workflow. This capability can provide further usability advantages for Roambi, which scored the highest rating in this area in our Mobile Business Intelligence Value Index.

Roambi announced its mobile BI support for the Google Android mobile operating system that operates across a wide range of those smartphone and tablet technologies. It had delayed its development of its software on the Android platform, which required significant development resources and investment but was part of its strategy to maximize its business potential and relationship with Apple. The release are available at the Google Play store . The initial version will include four of Roambi’s most popular views: Card, Catalist, Layers and Superlist. Similar to its application for the Apple platform, security features for Android include Device Lockout, Remote Wipe and Application Passcode. Integration with Roambi’s partner Okta provides identity management services and gives access to any applications supported by Okta. Integration includes Active Directory (AD) and lightweight directory access protocol (LDAP). While Roambi Flow will not be available on Android out of the gate, the company says it will be becoming available by the end of 2014.

Current approaches to mobile business intelligence applications on the market include native, Web-based and hybrid (a combination of both). We compare these approaches in detail in the executive summary of our Mobile Business Intelligence Value Index report.With the new Android support, Roambi has a unique approach to the hybrid architecture that bypasses the browser completely. There is no data cached in a browser and in fact the data is loaded directly to the device and rendered through Roambi natively on the device.  From the user’s perspective, the benefit of this approach is performance since interactivity does not rely on data traveling over a network. A second benefit is offline access to data, which is not available via non-native approaches. From the developer’s or information assembler perspective, testing across browsers is not needed since there is no data caching and the experience is the same regardless of browser in use.

vr_Info_Optimization_16_information_software_evaluation_criteriaOur next-generation business intelligence research shows that executives strongly support mobile BI: Nearly half of them said that mobility is very important to their BI processes. Executives also favor Apple over Android devices which is likely one of the key reasons for Apple’s dominance in the current business intelligence landscape. However our research shows latent demand for Android devices in the business intelligence market and given the dominance of Android in the consumer market as well as dominance in places like Asia and other emerging markets, any company that seeks to take significant global market share will need support for both platforms. Our information optimization research fond Google Android as second in smartphone platform (24%) behind Apple iPhone (59%) as first ranked position. Therefore, Android support is an important evolution for Roambi in order to address an increasing demand in the market for Android devices.

Usability has become the most important evaluation criteria and in the information optimization benchmark research was selected as most important to over half (58%) of organizations. Roambi ranked as the highest in usability in the Ventana Research Mobile Business Intelligence Value Index, though its overall score was hampered somewhat by the lack of support for Android. With Android support, the company now addresses the need for multiple and the so called bring your own device (BYOD) to work methods now becoming more prevalent and allowed by organizations. By addressing this as well as taking advantages of broader market developments such as the new Apple SDKs, Roambi continues to address what organizations find important today. Usability of business intelligence systems is a top priority for 63% of companies. Even our big data analytics research finds a growing level of overall importance for mobile access in almost half of organizations (46%).  Any company that wants to get a user friendly business intelligence into the hands of its mobile workers quickly and effectively should have Roambi in the consideration set.

Regards,

Tony Cosentino

VP and Research Director

MicroStrategy, announced version 9.3. The announcement came out of Amsterdam this month just in front of MicroStrategy World, the company’s annual conference for the European market. Release 9.3 delivers significant updates in four main areas: big data, advanced analytics, automated administration and visual data discovery.

The announcements on the big data front have to do with bringing data together from disparate sources, enriching available data, and new report search capabilities. Addressing the need to provide more automated support for data access and preparation are critical as found in our benchmark research on big data and our predictive analytics benchmark research as key obstacles to gaining business value from available data. The data source access improvements in 9.3 include improved access to departmental data, including data from spreadsheets and Salesforce.com, and from multidimensional sources such as Microsoft Analysis Services and Cognos TM1. The software can access data from SAP’s HANA appliance, and use a thrift connector to Hadoop distributions, including those of Cloudera and Amazon Web Services. The data enrichment enhancements include expansion of data based on ZIP code or date. Such location intelligence features address a hot area with great potential in the areas of database cleansing and enrichment. We’ll be exploring these trends in our upcoming benchmark research on location intelligence. MicroStrategy 9.3 also provides a Google-like function to discover reports and a dashboard, so users don’t have to spend unnecessary time looking for reports or creating new ones.

With respect to the Hadoop access, the company has four approaches. The first is to bring data from Hadoop into an in-memory structure for visual exploration and rapid prototyping using the imported data. This approach is interesting, but you still need to define your Hadoop queries before you do the analysis in memory, thus taking away the exploratory element of the big data. The second approach is to do freeform queries directly into Hadoop using Pig Latin or HiveQL.  This approach gives users back the exploratory aspect, but introduces complexity and sacrifices speed. The third approach is to model the data with a traditional multidimensional approach, while the fourth approach is to merge the Hadoop data with the enterprise data warehouse into a uniform view. The company says this last model is gaining traction for a number of their clients, which is in line with what we have been seeing from others in the space. Providing these options are critical as our big data benchmark research found that Hadoop as one of the key technologies planned in almost a third of organizations (32%).

For advanced analytics, the new release integrates R statistical packages into the MicroStrategy BI platform, which allows for advanced in-database analytics with any available R algorithm, including many custom R developments. Version 9.3 supports the most-used algorithms straight out of the box with more than 300 functions. While others have integrated R, few have gone as far as integrating the visualization aspects of R, as MicroStrategy does in this release. R is well-known as an analytical tool, but most users don’t know about its visualization capabilities. The R language is gaining traction in both the academic and business worlds, with universities, large government organizations and the pharmaceutical industry all showing significant support. This integration of predictive analytics into business intelligence is an important step for MicroStrategy and our predictive analytics benchmark found 58 percent of organizations have this as a priority.

The third area of improvement is introduction of System Manager, a GUI administrative workflow tool that the company claims will reduce operating costs by more than 50 percent. The tool allows users to create administrative workflows from both MicroStrategy admin products and third-party tools to do things such as create an Amazon instance. Use cases include MicroStrategy intelligence reports, daily report execution schedules, and migrating objects. The package is priced separately, which is fine since this is a capability most BI packages do not offer.

The fourth and final area of improvement involves the already formidable Visual Insights, a visual data discovery tool MicroStrategy introduced last year. Visual discovery tools continue to gain traction in the market due to their ease of use and their ability to give time back to analysts. Our benchmark research into big data found that visualization is a top priority and unmet need in 37 percent of existing deployments just as is predictive analytics in 41 percent of organizations. The new capabilities of the 9.3 release include density maps, which help to highlight geographic concentration levels such as sales volume. Users can create network diagrams for analytics with web traffic, affinity marketing, or market-basket analysis, and image layouts, which allow for visual mashups. Other enhancements to Visual Insight include a wizard to suggest appropriate visualizations based on the data, the ability to do rank filtering, and shortcuts to commonly used metrics such as counts, moving averages and running totals.  Finally, the ease of creating and distributing dashboards is significantly improved. Drag-and-drop visualizations, and the ability to do visualization-to-visualization overlays, are impressive, and I expect to see others try to emulate these in the future.

Mobile Business Intelligence wasn’t addressed directly in the 9.3 release, but MicroStrategy’s platform for mobile applications was the focus of the 9.2.1m release in January. Mobile intelligence is a big part of the MicroStrategy strategy, and it was also a big part of the conference in Amsterdam. In a separate blog post, I wrote about Michael Saylor’s keynote speech, his new book, The Mobile Wave, and the company’s direction in mobile technology. MicroStrategy has been investing heavily in mobile for a while, especially around native support for Apple’s iOS.

In sum, the MicroStrategy 9.3 release is a big advancement for a firm already providing leadership in the analytics market. Given the firm’s advantage of being an enterprise platform and moving into discovery tools with Visual Insights, it is likely in a better position to expand than many of the discovery players trying to move upstream into an enterprise role. The fact that the company has built the platform from the ground up also gives it an advantage over some of the larger players with less than organic strategies. For organizations with MicroStrategy already installed, the 9.3 upgrade (and memory upgrades) makes plenty of sense. Any firm looking for deeper support of Hadoop, predictive analytics and visual discovery should examine this 9.3 release from MicroStrategy.

Regards,

Tony Cosentino – VP & Research Director

On the heels of the release of his new book, The Mobile Wave, Microstrategy’s CEO Michael Saylor delivered an interesting keynote at Microstrategy World in Amsterdam this past week. Unlike other keynotes we’ve seen at various supplier conferences, the presentation was not a sales pitch. There was no reference to the fact that the company was simultaneously launching MicroStrategy 9.3, a major new release of its flagship offer. The presentation focused almost entirely on the rise of mobile computing and its ability to change the world. Saylor sees the Apple iPad at the heart of the mobile revolution, and notes that BI capabilities delivered through the device are displacing paper and people within organizations. The iPad’s 10-inch screen, which can display 90 percent of printed pages, is the key for companies to unlock the shackles of the physical office environment. Between the lines, it’s easy to read that Microstrategy is betting a lot on mobile and on the iPad.

Saylor’s argument against paper is relatively straightforward. For years we’ve been talking about the paperless office, but technology has not yet allowed us to get away from paper, and executives are still using it for all types of reports and data. Business intelligence before mobile was restricted to columnar reporting, and business intelligence before device interactivity was a manual, paper-based process in which an executive asked an analyst to run a report to answer a question, then looked at the report on paper. The results often inspired other questions, sending the executive back to the analyst to run yet another report – and so on.  Finally, once the executive’s questions were answered, he could ask an employee to take action based on his conclusions.

The iPad, Saylor argues, changes all of this, since iOS and the 10-inch screen allow us to look at standard-size documents and interact with company data. Given the revolutionary capabilities of mobile BI systems, an executive can interactively and visually query multiple data sources, get answers immediately, run his own scenarios, and take action, all from the sidelines of his kid’s soccer game. The executive, now doing the job of three people, is much more productive (if a bit lonelier).

How does the Microstrategy iPad-focused BI strategy stack up in the new mobile world that also contains tablets such as Google’s Nexus 7 and Microsoft’s Surface? With his presentation and over the course of the conference, Saylor took aim at the mobile strategy of a number of industry stalwarts, including Google and Microsoft. Microsoft in particular, he suggested, alienated both its customers and its partners with its recent preannouncement of the Surface tablet computer.

The most obvious competitor currently in the enterprise environment is Google’s Android, but the Android development community is focused around the smartphone, not the tablet. Google’s Nexus 7 suggests that the company is not keen to take on the iPad directly in the enterprise market; the 7-inch screen suggests consumer ambitions. One argument that Saylor gives against the Android is that it lacks tight enough integration between the hardware and the software for delivery on a 10-inch device. I’m curious whether this argument will still hold as Google starts to produce larger form-factor devices with tighter hardware and software integration, and as improved content parsing technologies allow for more information to be consumed on different-sized devices.

The more interesting enterprise play is around Microsoft’s Surface tablet running Windows 8 on Intel chips. When it is finally introduced, the Microsoft advantages will be hard to ignore. As it moves away from ARM-based chips, Microsoft will be able to provide full access to entrenched office productivity software, tight integration with other Windows-based hardware and software, and backward compatibility.  Hewlett Packard, in signing with Intel earlier this year, signaled its own move into Windows 8 tablets. HP’s global distribution power could make this an important milestone. The challenge is whether business will engage and consider Microsoft tablet or how many folks will bring this technology into business and expect support for it with business intelligence.

Unlike Google today and Microsoft tomorrow, Apple takes a “walled garden” approach to its operating system and applications, and enterprise IT departments generally do not like this idea, especially as it relates to security. On the other hand, the developer community in this garden is huge, and the “bring your own device” (BYOD) trend is really helping drive iPhone and iPad into the corporate market. The most influential businesspeople and cultural icons in our society carry iPads, and corporations, much to the chagrin of IT departments all over the world, are being forced to deal with this phenomenon.

On a practical note, I had an opportunity to test-drive MicroStrategy’s platform for mobile applications. I built a number of interactive mobile dashboards for the iPad, the iPhone, and for my own smartphone running Android. While things worked well with the iPad and the iPhone, the Android applications had a lot of issues. I’m not sure if this was due to the lack of Microstrategy focus on Android, or to Android itself. What I do know is that Microstrategy Mobile works well on iPad; just about any user can create designs with minimal training, and not having to wait for coders is a huge advantage.

Nevertheless, an Apple-focused bet in the enterprise environment is a bit risky as new devices come onto the market. It will be interesting to look at Microstrategy’s tack in the context of our upcoming Next Generation Business Intelligence Benchmark Research, which focuses on mobile and collaboration technologies in the enterprise BI environment.

Regards,

Tony Cosentino – VP & Research Director

RSS Tony Cosentino’s Analyst Perspectives at Ventana Research

  • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.

Tony Cosentino – Twitter

Error: Twitter did not respond. Please wait a few minutes and refresh this page.

Stats

  • 73,368 hits
%d bloggers like this: