You are currently browsing the monthly archive for August 2015.

Our recently completed benchmark research on data and analytics in the cloud shows that analytics deployed in cloud-based systems is gaining widespread adoption. Almost half (48%) of vr_DAC_04_widespread_use_of_cloud_based_analyticsparticipating organizations are using cloud-based analytics, another 19 percent said they plan to begin using it within 12 months, and 31 percent said they will begin to use cloud-based analytics but do not know when. Participants in various areas of the organization said they use cloud-based analytics, but front-office functions such as marketing and sales rated it important more often than did finance, accounting and human resources. This front-office focus is underscored by the finding that the categories of information for which cloud-based analytics is most often deemed important are forecasting (mentioned by 51%) and customer-related (47%) and sales-related (33%) information.

The research also shows that while adoption is high, organizations face challenges as they seek to realize full value from their cloud-based data and analytics initiatives. Our Performance Index analysis reveals that only one in seven organizations reach the highest Innovative level of the four levels of performance in their use of cloud-based analytics. Of the four dimensions we use to further analyze performance, organizations do better in Technology and Process than in Information and People. That is, the tools and analytic processes used for data and analytics in the cloud have advanced more rapidly than users’ abilities to work with their information. The weaker performance in People and Information is reflected in findings on the most common barriers to deployment of cloud-based analytics: lack of confidence about the security of data and analytics, mentioned by 56 percent of organizations, and not enough skills to use cloud-based analytics (42%).

Given the top barrier of perceived data security issues, it is not surprising the research finds that the largest percentage of organizations (66%) use a private cloud, which by its nature ostensibly is more secure, to deploy analytics; fewer use a public cloud (38%) or a hybrid cloud (30%), although many use more than one type today. We know from tracking analytics and business intelligence software providers that operate in the public cloud that this is changing quite rapidly. Comparing vr_DAC_06_how_to_deploy_cloud_based_analyticsdeployment by industry sector, the research analysis shows that private and hybrid clouds are more prevalent in the regulated areas of finance, insurance and real estate and government than in services and manufacturing. The research suggests that private and hybrid cloud deployments are used more often for analytics where data privacy is a concern.

Furthermore, organizations said that access to data for analytics is easier with private and hybrid clouds (29% for public cloud vs. 58% for private cloud and 67% for hybrid cloud). In addition, organizations using private and hybrid cloud more often said they have improved communication and information sharing (56% public vs. 72% private and 70% hybrid). Thus, the research data makes clear that organizations feel more comfortable implementing analytics in a private or hybrid cloud in many areas.

Private and hybrid cloud implementations of data and analytics often coincide with large data integration efforts, which are necessary at some point to benefit from such deployments. Those who said that integration is very important also said more often than those giving it less importance that cloud-based analytics helps their customers, partners and employees in an array of ways, including improved presentation of data and analytics (62% vs. 43% of those who said integration is important or somewhat important), gaining access to many different data sources (57% vs. 49%) and improved data quality and data management (59% vs. 53%). We note that the focus on data integration efforts correlates more with private and hybrid cloud approaches than with public cloud approaches, thus the benefits cannot be directly assigned to the various cloud approaches nor the integration efforts.

Another key insight from the research is that data and analytics often are considered in conjunction with mobile and collaboration initiatives which have different priorities for business than IT or in consumer markets. Nine out of 10 organizations said they use or intend to use collaboration technology to support their cloud-based data and analytics, and 83 percent said they need to support data access and analytics on mobile devices. Two-thirds said they support both tablets and smartphones and multiple mobile operating systems, the most important of which are Apple iOS (ranked first by 60%), Google Android (ranked first by 26%) and Microsoft Windows Mobile (ranked first by 13%). We note that Microsoft has a higher percentage of importance here than its reported market share (approximately 2.5%) would suggest. Similarly, Google Android has greater penetration than Apple in the consumer market (51% vs. 41%). We expect that the influence of mobile operating systems related to data and analytics in the cloud will continue to evolve and be impacted by upcoming corporate technology refreshment cycles, the consolidation of PCs and mobile devices, and the “bring your own device” (BYOD) trend.

The research finds that usability (63%) and reliability (57%) arevr_DAC_20_evaluation_criteria_for_cloud_based_analytics the top technology buying criteria, which is consistent with our business technology innovation research conducted last year. What has changed is that manageability is cited as very important as often as functionality, by approximately half of respondents, a stronger showing than in our previous research.  We think it likely that manageability is gaining prominence as cloud providers and organizations sort out issues in who manages deployments along with usage and licensing, along with who actually owns your data in the cloud which my colleague Robert Kugel has discussed.

As the research shows, the importance of cloud data and analytics is continuing to grow. The importance of this topic makes me eager to discuss further the attitudes, re­quire­­ments and future plans of organizations that use data and analytics in the cloud and to identify the best prac­tices of those that are most proficient in it. For more information on this topic, and learn more on best practices for data and analytics in the cloud, and download the executive summary of the report to improve your readiness.

Regards,

Ventana Research

Our research into next-generation predictive analytics shows that along with not having enough skilled resources, which I discussed in my previous analysisNGPA AP #4 image 1the inability to readily access and integrate data is a primary reason for dissatisfaction with predictive analytics (in 62% of participating organizations). Furthermore, this area consumes the most time in the predictive analytics process: The research finds that preparing data for analysis (40%) and accessing data (22%) are the parts of the predictive analysis process that create the most challenges for organizations. To allow more time for actual analysis, organizations must work to improve their data-related processes.

Organizations apply predictive analytics to many categories of information. Our research shows that the most common categories are customer (used by 50%), marketing (44%), product (43%), financial (40%) and sales (38%). Such information often has to be combined from various systems and enriched with information from new sources. Before users can apply predictive analytics to these blended data sets, the information must be put into a common form and represented as a normalized analytic data set. Unlike in data warehouse systems, which provide a single data source with a common format, today data is often located in a variety of systems that have different formats and data models. Much of the current challenge in accessing and integrating data comes from the need to include not only a variety of relational data sources but also less structured forms of data. Data that varies in both structures and sizes is commonly called big data.

To deal with the challenge of storing and computing big data, organizations planning to use predictive analytics increasingly turn to big data technology. While flat files and relational databases on standard hardware, each cited by almost two-thirds (63%) of participants, are still the most commonly used tools for predictive analytics, more than half (52%) of organizations now use data warehouse appliances for Using Big Data with Predictive Analytics predictive analytics, and 31 percent use in-memory databases, which the second-highest percentage (24%) plan to adopt in the next 12 to 24 months. Hadoop and NoSQL technologies lag in adoption, currently used by one in four organizations, but in the next 12 to 24 months an additional 29 percent intend to use Hadoop and 20 percent more will use other NoSQL approaches. Furthermore, more than one-quarter (26%) of organizations are evaluating Hadoop for use in predictive analytics, which is the most of any technology.

 Some organizations are considering moving from on-premises to cloud-based storage of data for predictive analytics; the most common reasons for doing so are to improve accessing data (for 49%) and preparing data for analysis (43%). This trend speaks to the increasing importance of cloud-based data sources as well as cloud-based tools that provide access to many information sources and provide predictive analytics. As organizations accumulate more data and need to apply predictive analytics in a scalable manner, we expect the need to access and use big data and cloud-based systems to increase.

While big data systems can help handle the size and variety of data, they do not of themselves solve the challenges of data access and normalization. This is especially true for organizations that need to blend new data that resides in isolated systems. How to do this is critical for organizations to consider, especially in light of the people using predictive analytic system and their skills. There are three key considerations here. One is the user interface, the most common of which are spreadsheets (used by 48%), graphical workflow modeling tools (44%), integrated development environments (37%) and menu-driven modeling tools (35%). Second is the number of data sources to deal with and which are supported by the system; our research shows that four out of five of organizations need to access and integrate five or more data sources. The third consideration is which analytic languages and libraries to use and which are supported by the system; the research finds that Microsoft Excel, SQL, R, Java and Python are the most widely used for predictive analytics. Considering these three priorities both in terms of the resident skills, processes, current technology, and information sources that need to be accessed are crucial for delivering value to the organization with predictive analytics.

While there has been an exponential increase in data available to use in predictive analytics as well as advances in integration technology, our research shows that data access and preparation are still the most challenging and time-consuming tasks in the predictive analytics process. Although technology for these tasks has improved, complexity of the data has increased through the emergence of different data types, large-scale data and cloud-based data sources. Organizations must pay special attention to how they choose predictive analytics tools that can give easy access to multiple diverse data sources including big data stores and provide capabilities for data blending and provisioning of analytic data sets. Without these capabilities, predictive analytics tools will fall short of expectations.

Regards,

Ventana Research

RSS Tony Cosentino’s Analyst Perspectives at Ventana Research

  • An error has occurred; the feed is probably down. Try again later.

Tony Cosentino – Twitter

Error: Twitter did not respond. Please wait a few minutes and refresh this page.

Stats

  • 73,277 hits
%d bloggers like this: